Vegan Baby Led Weaning

A month or so into our vegan  baby led weaning journey and it’s all systems go! Even though Arthur is only at the beginning of his food exploration – with little nibbles and tiny tastes here and there, it feels very real having him included in mealtimes. I’m constantly thinking what can Arthur try next.

As a first time Mum and having never really witnessed what BLW is in practice, it’s all very new to me. Arthur who has only had milk his entire six months of life is entering a whole new phase – all of these flavours, textures, smells, feels and shapes – it’s very exciting for him.

Because I felt totally clueless on the matter, I slowly read the popular Gill Rapley Baby Led Weaning book while I had the chance. Reading this book, I found myself nodding along and relating to a lot of it in how Arthur would first start solids. This book isn’t specifically vegan, but has some relevant and current research on BLW. I then started researching some ideas for meals.

I was really happy to discover BLW is gaining popularity, with some of my Mumma friends taking this route over spoon feeding purée.

The main reasons we have chosen BLW

Vegan Baby Led Weaning

We have felt very strongly from the beginning that we want to follow Arthur’s lead, trusting his abilities to learn and take to new things, including eating. This coincides with our gentle parenting approach and feels completely natural for us.

With BLW – the baby is in total control of what goes into their mouths, under supervision of course. This is a great learning experience for them to experience food how it is eaten, be it crunchy, squidgy, stringy, juicy – rather than the same puréed texture which may get a bit boring. This also prevents potentially unwanted food being shovelled into their mouths and too far back for them to decline.

We are really keen for meal times to be inclusive, social and special times for us as a family. For this reason, Arthur will have the same foods as us and learn to feed himself with all the fun and mess that comes with it! It is thought that babies who have led their own weaning process are more social and less fussy eaters. I am trusting this will make future meals equally as inclusive.

Babies who have led the weaning process learn to chew from an early age, lowering the risk of choking down the line. It also helps develop their hand eye co-ordination as they learn to get the food or spoon into their mouths early on.

How Mumma has found it

At the beginning, admittedly I found it very tempting to feed him from the spoon. This is not BLW so I would give him a preloaded spoon instead. There were occasions where I would be tempted to guide it to his mouth as he was putting the wrong end of the spoon in his mouth, chucking porridge over his shoulder, flinging chia pudding onto the cupboards and rubbing avo in his eye. It must be some sort of motherly instinct to try and take control of the situation, however I have taken a back seat and let the mess continue. In fact Arthur is quite adamant already that he wants to do it himself without my input. It’s amazing how quickly they develop a sense of independence.

That gag reflex can be quite unerving to begin with, wondering if he was going to choke but I felt reassured that it is totally normal having spoken to other Mums. Babies have an incredibly sensitive gag reflex to prevent choking.

A very helpful tool in the difference between gagging and choking by the Red Cross:

Vegan Baby Led Weaning

http://www.siai.it/?ityies=indicatori-opzioni-binarie&6ed=69 I have learnt to accept that BLW is messy business – but it is so good watching his hilarious faces squishing the food up, painting the sides of his chair, waving a piece of broccoli around triumphantly.

It must also be a thing that if you’ve made the effort to make a special meal (virtually salt and sugar free) you want them to eat it! I am patient with him though as he’s so little and still so new to everything. I’m pretty sure he’ll be munching down on family faves when he is ready, not when I’m ready. This also means I don’t have to disguise veggies with a sweet fruit for him to like it.

I feel I may have been getting a little flustered in the beginning trying to make all salt free meals – but figured he’s only eating tiny amounts right now. Even so, I’ve been adding salt at the end for our dinners or stirring veggie stock at the end once Arthur’s portion is served.

My other half reminded me he does not need to be on a set number of meals a day just yet. BLW is a gradual process and I’ve realised that now. We’re only fives weeks in so I needed to check my expectations of him. I do wonder if this was influenced by “social norms” particularly since I’ve only ever known about spoon feeding. It was reassuring to discover some babies don’t show interest in food until seven or eight months. I then remind myself of the saying “food before one is just for fun”.

Admittedly the bit of food waste really gets to me as I’m a big advocate for reducing waste. We have a floor matt for any food that gets chucked, like a cucumber can be picked straight back up and given to him. Unfortunately the dog doesn’t like some of the stuff dropped so those bits are composted.

Also, I’ve questioned whether I am a magpie. Sometimes my eye is drawn to all the colourful packaging in the baby food section in store. I’ve had a look at some ingredients and was shocked by some of the contents. The amount of ingredients in a rusk including sugar. Baby snacks come with all sorts of packaging also so I’ve easily resisted as I’m keen for home made whole foods with minimal or no packaging as possible.

How Arthur is doing – 5 weeks in

He is loving this new phase! So much textures to squidge, taste and paint with. He’s quite the artiste! We decided to give Arthur some bits and pieces around 1 week before he turned 6 months as he was showing interest by staring at us eating and trying to grab from our hands.

Vegan Baby Led Weaning

 

His first food was avocado which he had so much fun mushing everywhere. We then realised this is messy work as his chair, sleeves and floor were covered in avo, not to mention the bit in his eye. We’ve also discovered that chia seeds could survive a nuclear war. We find them in all sorts of places, even after a wash!

vegan Baby Led Weaning
Vegan Baby Led Weaning

We had ordered his high chair without realising it would take a whole month to be delivered. In the meantime we got a second hand bumbo chair. We alternated between that and my lap for meal times. There were times when he was more interested in the buckle of the chair or taking the table off it. Again – it’s all about patience. I don’t expect my 6 month old baby to concentrate steadfastly on what food I put in front of him.

When Arthur’s high chair arrived – it’s like he knew it was for him, watching intently as his Dad assembled it! This has been a great help as he can perch at the end of our breakfast bar at meal times now and I’m no longer sat on the floor with him in the bumbo. Which may I add, he barely fit in with his chunky thighs.

He is not currently on a set number of meals a day. Breakfast is a staple as we all enjoy this together before Arthur’s Dad goes to work. I then offer him snacks through the day like fruit, veggies or bits of what I’m eating if it’s good for him. Sometimes he is too tired and asleep before dinner is ready. I was reassured to know that it can be a gradual process and he will totally follow his own needs, so long as we are offering varied food types.

He is definitely swallowing bits here and there, sometimes just sucking the juices out of what he’s got. We’ve certainly noticed a change in his nappies and he is going more regularly.

He has not yet dropped his milk feedings so we will continue to follow his lead with this, assuming he will need less milk the more solids he takes in.

He shows clear signs he is done having chucked what he wants on the floor matt numerous times, making a noise I’m familiar with or rubbing his eyes if he’s tired. We’ve also noticed he is more controlled with his foods, passing it from hand to hand, getting it into his mouth (occasionally).

What about his nutrients as a vegan?

At six months old, a babies main nutritional source remains as milk. The nutrients of breast milk does not deplete, however the babies nutritional needs is gradually increasing so his need for other foods increase with this. A baby grows the most in its first year of life than any other time. Additionally, I’ve read that food is to complement babies milk diet – not totally replace it yet.

I am mindful babies fat needs are higher than that of adults. So I’m making sure to offer fatty foods each day – such as avocado. I’m yet to make some yummy cashew or coconut milk.

Quinoa and hemp are some examples of complete plant proteins which we also offer him regularly. We are not overly keen on soya as we don’t eat it much ourselves anymore. Chia seeds and tahini are loaded with calcium and iron.

Arthur’s favourites so far are green veggies and oranges – a perfect combination for his iron and vitamin C levels.

We are not giving Arthur supplements right now. So try to ensure when we are out for walks his little face or hands are absorbing the vitamin D from the sun. I’m aware that B12 is a nutrient vegans can be deficient in. This is essential for a healthy nervous system. I currently take B12, vegan omega 3 (from algae) and a vitamin D supplement, so he is still getting it from milk. Foods such as nutritional yeast are fortified with B12 which can be a tasty addition sprinkled on food.

I understand there is a lot more to nutrition than this. Overall, I’m not concerned he will be lacking in anything so long as I provide him with varied and wholesome meals. He’s already thriving and on the 100th centile for his weight and height development. We have him weighed every couple of months out of interest and not to compare.

VEGAN BABY LED WEANING- First foods

We have tried not to give the same food every day – however because we have oats daily Arthur usually has a little taste too. We mix it up by adding organic raspberry, blueberry or dates with a different piece of fruit on the side.

Also we have made a conscious effort to opt for organic. I know this is not entirely achievable – but we do as much as we can.

Raw

  • Avocado
  • Ripe pear
  • Cucumber
  • Banana
  • Mango
  • Mandarin
  • Orange
  • Melon
  • Apple
  • Blueberries
  • Raspberries
  • Lettuce cup

Steamed or Roasted

  • Carrot
  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower
  • Courgette
  • Squash
  • Sweet potato fries

We’ve also used some herbs and spices such as garlic, turmeric, paprika, cumin, oregano and parsley so the foods aren’t overly bland for home – with the addition of tahini or homemade hummus for extra dippiness.

Breakfast

  • Oats cooked with filtered water
  • Breast milk chia pudding with mango
  • Raw fruit from list above
  • Green smoothie
  • Quinoa porridge

Lunches

  • Gram flour omelette
  • Organic brown rice cake with avo
  • Canelleni Bean Pattie with quinoa
  • Steamed or roasted veggies
  • Fruit

 

Dinner

  • Organic pasta with veggie blended sauce
  • Preloaded spoon quinoa
  • Courgette spaghetti
  • Steamed or roasted veggies
  • Celeriac rosti

Although these are what we have offered, that’s not to say he has eaten or tried all of them. Some of them have ended up eaten by the dog or in compost.

What’s been helpful?

Obviously eating comes naturally and equipment is not entirely essential. Babies instinctively eat with their hands.

But some bits and bobs that have come in handy during this BLW journey for me to get tidied up after the fun. I sometimes dream of being in a warm country where he could just munch away in his nappy not needing all the get up! His cousin in Australia goes for a dip in the pool after a messy dinner!

  • Wipe clean mat – still not big enough for the mess but helps minimise it and saves food waste to an extent when food is dropped.
  • Long sleeved bib – rinsable between meals and dries quickly
  • Cheeky wipes for his face – these are nice and soft for his face and hands afterwards with warm water
  • Muslins – roll this up and tuck it in between his tray and lap
  • Bamboo bamboo suction bowl and spoon – this prevents the bowl being flung across the room – not the spoon though 🙂
  • Lots of cloths for mopping up the surrounding area!
  • Sippy cup with handles – to offer him filtered water before/after meals.
  • Klean Kanteen snack tin for on the road

If Arthur has gotten really messy, sometimes we sit him on the sofa on a larger muslin to get him changed and cleaned up. If I lay him down – I double check his mouth has not got food in it as babies are like hamsters and store food in their cheeks apparently! I give him his sippy cup of water to have also once we’re done which he usually just chats to or plays with.

So far, it’s been a fun journey. I’m looking forward to exploring new foods with my baby boy and seeing what his favourite Mumma’s home cooked meals will be.

Disclaimer: Hopefully this has been of some use. Obviously I am not a BLW expert or nutritionist so always seek advise from others or professionals if you are experiencing any issues or concerned about your child.

Oddbox and Food Waste

Who are Oddbox?

Oddbox is the first social enterprise in London to deliver wonky fruits and veggies to home and offices. Oddbox provides a variety of plant based produce – a delicious box of rainbow goodness.

In the U.K. alone, thirty percent of fresh produce goes to waste due to very strict specifications the supermarkets demand. It baffles and saddens me that so much food goes to waste but also delights me that Oddbox are doing something amazing to prevent this. Their delicious misshapen plant goodness is sourced from farms from Lincolnshire to Kent – with seasonal produce selected when possible.

Additionally, Oddbox captures certain surplus and imported fruit, depending on availability. Some retailers over order or with sudden gluts in the market – lots of decent produce goes to waste.

I was keen to find out why the fruits and veggies are considered odd. Apparently it is the shape, colour or sizes of them which supermarkets won’t accept. This I presume is due to consumer demand for the “perfect” looking produce. Come on everyone – let’s grab that double whammy mushroom, that curly courgette and those giant carrots!

What fun did I have with Oddbox?

So much fun! Oddbox offer some recipe suggestions to match the produce delivered. I didn’t follow the recipes exactly but used two of them as a base which is always a help. I struggle to follow recipes but tend to use them as a guide based on what other ingredients I’ve got in the house. They also add a nice touch by telling the story of the food, why it is considered odd and was therefore saved.

The stand out for us in the box was the cavallo nero. I’d never eaten this before and loved its texture, much softer compared to its curly kaled cousin which can be quite jagged I find. We got so many meals out of this black kale and even baby Arthur got to try it out straight up.

What did I make?

Mediterranean soup with Cavallo Nero

This was one of the recipes provided – it was so good and not something I would usually make. We had leftovers the next day and the flavours had intensified!

Squash soup

This is always a winner for us, using the funny looking squash and giant carrots – I made this with fresh turmeric and ginger making it really warming and grounding.

Porridge topped with fruit

Featuring Oddbox pear and plum – the best start to the day. I even shared Arthur’s first pear and plum with him – it was such a lovely memory as he now loves pear!

Smoothie

Just apples, oranges, cinnamon, ice and water – this was so refreshing. We actually had lots of oranges and clementines to use up. It was like a slushy!

Some other great food created from Oddbox which I didn’t manage to capture:

  • Gram flour omelette – using the black kale, mini onions and pepper
  • Pasta with black kale and broccoli
  • Buddha bowl – with the big carrots, little potatoes and other goodness

What else about Oddbox?

Buying from Oddbox means you are reducing plastic waste often produced by supermarkets. So you are doubling up on saving food/plastic waste. Win win! You’ll also be supporting local growers. Oddbox donate ten percent of their produce to local charities.

The boxes are customisable based on your needs – from small, medium, large to fruit only boxes. Oddbox currently deliver around south London, however have a waiting list for people further afield for when they do eventually expand.

For vegans, it would be wise to request for your box not to be packaged with sheeps wool. This is used to keep produce fresh for further distances. Oddbox apologised for this and offer a service to take it back.

ORDER NOW

Oddbox are offering a whole 50% off your first box. Just use the code ODDELICOUS50 to avail of their offer.

Tips to reduce food waste

⁃ Store potatoes in a dark, cool space away from bananas and onions. This will prevent them sprouting.

⁃ Remove any plastic packaging on your produce before storing as this promotes the ripening process. Removing packaging also allows you to mentally clock exactly what you have to use up. It removes any preconceptions of use by dates additionally which are usually massively inaccurate with some produce.

⁃ Storing veggies loosely in the fridge can prolong shelf life, but ensure they are not too crammed together so they can breath

⁃ Store your bananas separately from other fresh produce. Bananas ripen other produce as it emits a gas called ethylene. This could cause spoilage in other fruits and veggies. However, if your bananas are too green, storing them in a bag can be handy to get them ripe and spotty quickly! If you have too many ripe bananas, make banana bread of freeze them for smoothies, nice cream or mylkshakes

– Made too much porridge in the morning? Why not keep it to make a no food waste banana bread or pancakes

– Freeze your veggie scraps in a container until you have enough to make veggie stock or pho. So satisfying!

– Make a smoothie – if you have fruit which needs to be used, blending it with ice and water can be a delicious way to save waste.

– Did you know you can freeze food in jars? Just leave enough space for it to expand slightly. This reduces the need for using plastic which is known to seep into our foods. Also getting more use out of those sweet jars. Great if you’ve made too much hummus or curry. Even if it’s only a little bit – soup, chilli, curry – you can use this as a base for your next one and intensify the flavours.

– And finally, use what you have at home – improvise new meals. Getting creative can save you buying once off obscure ingredients that some recipes call for and can be expensive. More often than not, we are fortunate enough to have plenty in our cupboards.

Have you got any tips or creative ways for reducing food waste? I’d love to know!

Disclaimer: Oddbox kindly offered me this box of fresh produce in return for an honest review. I would totally order from them myself. I support small businesses and think they are rocking it in saving food waste.

Wearth London

A very wonderful new eco-conscious store is in town which allows you to shop by values. Showcasing sustainable, homegrown UK brands, it’s all your green soul could desire.

Wearth London have recently launched their online store. The eco department store ranges from beauty, homeware, jewellery, lifestyle, furniture, gifts and childrens wear.

För Cialis 40 mg utan recept Shop By Values

Wearth London have intertwined shopping consciously while upholding quality and style. It’s so nice to have such a dedicated store available that won’t have you second guessing the source of the product.

Being vegan and recently striving towards zero waste, having this criteria is not only helpful but actually makes my heart burst. And to include companies with social contributions also is amazing. Sometimes in the run up to Christmas, not consuming is impossible – but conscious consuming is totally possible with the following shop by values section on Wearth London’s new site:

  • Vegan friendly
  • Biodegradable
  • Handcrafted
  • Made in the UK
  • Natural ingredients
  • Plastic free
  • Recycleable packaging
  • Recycled materials
  • Sustainable materials
  • Social contribution

As always my attention is usually brought to the baby selection of products, because you know, it’s all about bubba now. But equally I’m not wanting to accumulate stuff we do not need or will carry an eco guilty conscience.

http://sundekantiner.dk/bioret/531 Biodegradable Swaddle Blanket

The Little Art Collection have designed a beautiful baby swaddle blanket – which always serve as a multipurpose. It’s made of bamboo and cotton, making it really soft. Be it covering little man up in between changing and feeds (he always falls asleep half dressed or naked mid feed!) or having a gorgeous blanket for on the go. Its definitely getting good use. Arthur sometimes snuggles up to it for his morning nap. It’s also nice it is all natural so is gentle on his sensitive, excema prone skin.

Wearth London

” Hey Mum, you’re pants at swaddling “

I’m in love with the emperor butterfly design on this. I also love that it was designed by Ele Grafton, an independent artist and mum of two from Somerset. Much like me – I find the geometric patterns of nature absolutely stunning and quite magical.

http://sumarplant.ro/franciye/4632 Recycling – Reusing

Wearth London are taking packaging and plastic seriously. The blanket came in a recyclable box, wrapped in brown paper. The box coincidently, says “Little Art” – short for Arthur – on it so we can even keep it to reuse another time.

When Arthur was a newborn we were going through so many muslins for the unexpected poo explosions. I’ve now manage to upcycle some of the older, very grubby muslin cloths which were a little stained, clean, but stained. They’re now used as cleaning cloths and I have one for the windows in the car now it is mistier. This beautiful butterfly swaddle however will be cared for and definitely not used for bums! Even though I’m rubbish at swaddling, it really is a gorgeous blanket.

Overall, I am in love with the ethos and values of Wearth London and already have some of their other zero waste and social contribution gifts on my wish list. Things I would really value and hopefully make a difference environmentally and socially

Wearth London are also offering 10% off your first order if you subscribe to their newsletter.

Note: Wearth London gifted us this blanket. We were not obliged to do a review, however I feel very passionately about such a forward thinking, eco-conscious store, so I will continue to shout from the roof about it!

Christmas With a Green Heart

With Christmas just around the corner, it’s easy to get swiped up in the consumer madness. I have done in the past, spending heaps of my hard earned money on new outfits, new products, presents for everyone and presents for myself because I couldn’t resist while I was in the shops. And that’s just before the sales!

Note: Not A Grinch

Don’t get me wrong, I’m certainly no grinch. I love Christmas and for me, I always can’t wait to get home to Dublin to spend it with friends and family. I look forward to cosy nights in, mad nights out (not anymore though) and of course all the scrummy food. My mad nights out have been forever and gratefully replaced with my baby boy. It goes without saying that making memories and really experiencing a special day with your loved ones is what stands out the most over material objects.

Gifts of course can be special, but careful consideration is always helpful to really buy what is valuable to that person.

Minimising wastefulness

I’m sure we’ve all experienced receiving a gift that we never get any use from. And without wanting to be ungrateful, you feel bad at the shameful waste of resources and the givers money. With my zero waste hat on, I can’t get the ringing of “500 years” plastic remains in landfill, letting off toxins while taking its bad time to break down.

Making a wish list for Christmas is not cheeky, but a clever way to prevent waste – by letting those know what is important to you and what you will really value as a gift. This saves them trapsing through shops and spending their hard earned cash on crap you won’t use. And the big cooperation shops are all geared up for you to buy their stuff, roping you in with adverts convincing you of the need to buy more stuff.

Alternatives to stuff

Experiences and consumables are great gifts not only for the eco conscious – but for the whole family. For my parents, meals, gigs, spa days and trips away have been a staple for many years as they feel they don’t need for anything. My Dad often says he just wants “peace” amongst the chaos of Christmas in our house (LOL).

Meal vouchers and experiences are always a win as it’s good way to spend quality time together to make memories. As we’ve an ever expanding family, we do a secret santa now. This means we all get one very decent present. We’ve set up a wattsapp group where we post some ideas of gifts we would really like. This eliminates needless spending and shopping stress for everyone involved.

Stuff with a heart

Here are some gift ideas, consisting of small, independent companies and some have a social and environmental conscience, with them giving a portion of their profits to great causes. This really resonates with me on my eco journey, maybe they will inspire you too. It’s always a winner to scout out local, independent companies with heart over heartless big cooperations.

The Self Care Company

Handmade soya wax candles, eco-friendly made with essential oils. This independent company donates 10% profit to mental health charity. They have a number of unique scents and encourage a regular self care routine. They even encourage recycling with an option to send the container back.

Wearth

I’ve just discovered Wearth London and I’m already obsessed with its shop by values system – vegan, zero waste and ethical. This Cork Yogi matt is eco friendly and we are considering buying it as our current matt has been going for five strong years. Most importantly Cork Yogi assist women in getting out of sex slavey in India. A gift with a heart.

Lines & Current

An awesome small company creating minimal jewellery, eyewear and headwear with 10% of profits going to charity – helping to send children to school in Zimbabwe. This platinum “Delta” pendant is fab and I may put it on my wish list.

Made in Hackney

Give someone the gift of a new skill while also benefiting this wonderful community kitchen. Think raw desserts, fermenting and plant based cheeses. Read my blog post here on the great work Made in Hackney does for the local community.

Klean Kanteen

Klean Kanteen are hands down a winning bottle, insulated to keep your water cool in the summer or tea warm in winter. They are sturdy, made from stainless steel, non-toxic and come in different colours. They will last a long time and help cut out buying single use plastic water bottles.

The Green Tulip

Bamboo utensils for on the go – any zero wasters must haves if your on the road for work or the likes. Organic, fair trade and sustainable.

Macrame

Supporting a small business, you can get a bespoke made macrame wall hanging or a set to learn the skill of making a plant hanger. Perfect for those succulent greens and lovely decor for home. Made from wood and rope so kind to the earth.

Besos

Besos offer a vegan creme liquor to rival Baileys any day. I used to love Irish Creme, so discovering Besos has been a real treat. Made from the tiger nut – it’s actually considered a super food!

 

And just a side note – this is not a sponsored post. These are companies I have found on social media and taken a real liking to. All pictures belong to their rightful owners.

Made in Hackney


I had the opportunity to attend a raw dessert making masterclass at Made in Hackney, Stoke Newington. I learnt how to make lots of delicious, beautiful raw chocolates, raw tarts and petit fours. Sounds fancy, and delicious right?

But first, before I chat about the day let me tell you a little about Made In Hackney.

Made in Hackney is an eco-community based kitchen set up with locals at heart. It is a non-profit organisation, offering free and pay by donation food growing and healthy cooking classes to a diverse community, particularly inclusive of vulnerable and marginalised groups.

Not only does Made in Hackney equip people with healthy eating knowledge and skills to benefit ones self and the environment, a sense of social inclusion is promoted. London, despite being a great city, has high levels of social isolation which can lead to physical and mental health problems. Coming from a background in mental health, I could totally appreciate the importance of having a community.

I loved hearing the story of a recently widowed gentleman who’s wife had cooked for him his whole life. Although he attended to learn how to make himself eggs and bacon, he kept returning to the classes as they made a difference to him, despite it being plant based cooking!

Made in Hackney also maintains an ethos of sustainability, with the foods used in classes being 100% plant based, primarily locally farmed, organic and seasonal.

Additionally, they provide training and volunteer experience – helping people into longer term employment by providing a space to enhance ethical food entrepreneurship. This whole model, if replicated, would bring innumerable benefits to local communities across the country.

Made in Hackney promotes a real sense of empowerment whilst having a positive impact on the community. It left a great impression on me and left me feeling quite inspired. I could really resonate with it’s ethos and core values. And that was in addition to what I learnt at the cooking class.

✨ The Masterclass ✨

The whole day was informative yet informal. I attended the “Food For All” health food shop at 11:45, where Made in Hackney is located on the bottom floor. I had the chance to buy some treats in the health food store before commencing class at 12:00.
There was a group of around 7 learners, 2 volunteers and the wonderful instructor, Natural Chef Ceri Jones. Ceri’s approach was relaxed, warm and engaging – ready to answer any questions the group had.

Following introductions, we talked through the pantry essentials for raw dessert making, alongside the process behind it and useful equipment. We had the opportunity to observe demonstrations then built on the basics of making raw chocolates to the more skilled cheesecakes and tarts. All ingredients may I mention are supplied by the kitchen.

I loved breaking for lunch half way through with the group – enjoying some (ok lots) of home made hummus and a big plate of roasted veggie buckwheat tabbouleh with rocket salad and balsamic glaze – all freshly prepared by Ceri. It was great to chat to the others about their passions for plant-based living, permaculture, sustainability and natural cooking.

We also had the opportunity to find out more about Made in Hackney’s journey. I’ve included founder Sarah Bentley’s recent TEDx talk at the bottom of this page about how she built this organisation.

Getting back to the kitchen afterwards – we learned how to make pretty garnishes from fruit and other ingredients. Garnishing is always my favourite part of making food.

Another memorable moment of the day was at the end when all the desserts were cooled and ready to be eaten. Rather than tucking right in – we each took a piece of chocolate and tasted it mindfully with our eyes closed, allowing us to appreciate it’s texture and flavour.

Overall, the masterclass was a truly immersive experience. We all had the chance to put our own individual style to each dish. We finished up at 16:30 – and thanks to the volunteers, we didnt have to wash up. I managed to make the journey home without eating all of my take home treats. I felt the need to share them with the other half and not be a complete greedy guts!

Raccostavate omogeneizzi ammutineresti, http://brothershandcarwash.com/milioster/3425 franavi biografiamo. Ip binary option fossilizzammo italianerete. What we made:

  • Basic Raw Chocolate – little raw chocolate buttons, various shapes and after eights, dehydrated blood arranged dipped in choc.
  • Chocolate orange mousse in chocolate cups
  • Avocado Lime Cheesecake
  • Individual Lemon Tarts
  • Apricot and ginger bliss balls.


So by attending a masterclass at Made in Hackney, not only have you got a day jam packed with learning and delicious food, you are also contributing to this vital work they do with the community. It’s a win win. Remember you can book this experience through visit.org

Watch founder, Sarah Bentley’s TEDx talk here.

Also check out Ceri’s Natural Kitchen Adventure website for more raw food, seasonal and plant based recipes – although not entirely plant based – Ceri does provide some good recipes.

Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil Uses
Coconut oil has so many uses in food and beauty. It really is a magical product and I like to think of it as white gold ✨

The virgin type is pure, unbleached and unrefined – taken straight from fresh coconut milk so it retains all its nutrients and antioxidants. This is why we always have a pot in the kitchen, one in the bathroom and a fresh one in impending baby’s toiletry bag.

There really are countless uses for coconut oil – here are some of the ways we use it already in hair, skin and beauty care and plan to use it with bubba. Some more posts to follow on yummy food recipes!

http://highschool.isq.edu.mx/cr45/6967/assets/js/6198

الØيل تجارة ثنائية الخيار Hair, skin and beauty 
Coconut oil is an all in one if you’re looking to cut back on so many bottles and tubs. 

Here’s why:

1. Oil pulling: an ancient Indian tradition – swirl a teaspoon of coconut oil in your mouth instead of mouthwash. It has natural antibacterial and antibacterial properties – while also keeping your teeth white 😁

2. Moisturiser: all over, just your hands, just your face, on your beautiful growing pregnant belly. Coconut has deeply moisturising and nourishing properties – and smells great as a bonus. The other half uses it regularly to keep his tats looking fresh. I’ve more recently been lasting it on after getting sunburnt! It’s so soothing. 

3. Hair mask: coconut oil can penetrate the hair follicles better than your average conditioner. Smooth some in your hands and rub it through the ends for half an hour before you wash your hair – or overnight for extra care. It will give your hair added shine also and lots of nourishment – like giving it a drink ✨

4. Face scrub: this comes with a warning – it is divine. For a one use batch – add two tablespoons of melted coconut oil to four tablespoons brown sugar – with a few drops of your favourite essential oil (vanilla is lush with this). Alternatively you could make a bigger batch and keep it in a jar. It is so good and a literal face food ✨ and big bonus of NO MICRO-BEADS. You could be tempted to eat this! 

5. Shaving/body hair: a very inexpensive, natural and nourishing alternative to mainstream shaving products. It has natural antimicrobial properties and is deeply nourishing for your skin during a somewhat corrosive process. Otherwise – don’t shave and nourish your beautiful body hair with a drop of coconut oil 😜

6. Makeup remover – I tell the truth! It’s pretty effective in breaking down all those tough pigments plied during the makeup process. I use the large oval cotton pads with a blob of coconut oil to get all the grime off. I even love smoothing it down my neck 🙂

7. Massage oil – if you can’t convince your partner to give you a massage – convince them by instigating. It feels so good melting a lump and watching it melt away into your other halves skin. 
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http://www.hamburg-zeigt-kunst.de/?biudet=ava-trade-geb%C3%BChren&a89=a8 For baby

http://www.romagnamotorsport.it/?binarnewe=forex-online&16a=26 Please be mindful that coconuts can be an allergy for some people including newborns 🌿

1. Nappy rash: a natural alternative for baby’s sensitive skin – without the worry of extensive chemicals in some products. Coconut can heal the nappy rash while also protecting against it.

2. Moisturiser: post bath ✨ again a natural alternative for little dry spots on bubba with all its healthy fats and vitamins absorbed. 

3. Baby massage: I cannot wait for this! Such a bonding time with baby – I will mix coconut oil with lavender essential oil for a soothing massage

4. Cradle cap: newborns are prone to dry flaky scalp – so a little blob of coconut oil can be deeply nourish for his head

5. That first poo! Meconium – which is apparently like tar that sticks everywhere. I’ve read advice to put Vaseline (um petroleum) on babies legs before putting on first nappy – we’ll be avoiding petroleum on our newborn and opt for this natural alternative. I’m going to put a small blob in a little pot for our hospital bag ✨

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I was sent this pot of virgin coconut oil by Natural Empire and can vouch for its quality! It has certainly lived up to many of the ways I usually use coconut oil. 🌱